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UU History

Ebenezer Scrooge’s conversion

Looking back

Ebenezer Scrooge’s conversion

Charles Dickens’s novels reflect the central ideas of nineteenth-century Unitarianism.

Michael Timko | 12/19/2005 | Winter 2005

Kindergarten’s radical advocate

Looking back

Kindergarten’s radical advocate

Elizabeth Palmer Peabody saw her educational work as part of a larger effot to reform human society.

Christopher L. Walton | 7/1/2004 | July/August 2004

‘We do’

Feature

‘We do’

Same-sex marriage comes to Massachusetts as deeper and broader trends make the rest of the country more tolerant, too.

Neil Miller | 5/1/2004 | May/June 2004

Cecelia Payne-Gaposchkin: Astronomer and pioneer

Looking back

Cecelia Payne-Gaposchkin: Astronomer and pioneer

The brilliant astronomer who was also the first woman to receive tenure on Harvard’s faculty also taught Sunday school at her Unitarian church.

Herbert F. Vetter | 1/1/2003 | January/February 2003

It came upon a Unitarian midnight clear

Looking back

It came upon a Unitarian midnight clear

Edmund Hamilton Sears’s beloved carol longs for peace.

Ken Sawyer | 12/23/2002 | November/December 2002

Beautiful words

Feature

Beautiful words

Master calligrapher Margaret Shepherd transforms ‘the words the church is made of’ into dazzling modern art.

Christopher L. Walton | 3/1/2002 | March/April 2002

Storms facing West

Feature

Storms facing West

Twenty-five years after Bob West navigated the denomination through the painful and divisive 1970s, he is regarded by many as the ‘unsung hero of the UUA.’

Warren R. Ross | July/August 2002

Charles Dickens and the notion of evil

Bookshelf

Charles Dickens and the notion of evil

Although his true villains are never redeemed, Dickens' novels demonstrate that good wins in the end.

Susan Jhirad | Winter 2014

P.T. Barnum: The greatest faith on Earth

Looking back

P.T. Barnum: The greatest faith on Earth

Circus promoter P.T. Barnum created ‘the greatest show on earth,’ but he was equally devoted to championing his religion, Universalism.

Hank Peirce | September/October 2003

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