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UUA celebrates same-sex marriage anniversary in Massachusetts

The party included music, a wedding cake, toasts, and thousands of paper hearts sent by UU children and adults from across the continent.
By Staff Writer
Fall 2005 8.15.05

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Hundreds of supporters of marriage equality, including many married same-sex couples, gathered May 17 at Unitarian Universalist Association headquarters in Boston to celebrate the first anniversary of equal marriage in Massachusetts. The party included music, a wedding cake, toasts, and thousands of paper hearts sent by UU children and adults from across the continent. The hearts, bearing messages such as “Love Won Out!,” “UUs Support all Families,” “Standing on the Side of Love,” and “Love is the Blueprint of a Family” decorated much of the building.

UUA president William G. Sinkford welcomed guest couples including Hillary and Julie Goodridge, David Wilson and Robert Compton, Gloria Bailey and Linda Davies, and Ed Balmelli and Michael Horgan, who were among the plaintiffs in the landmark civil-rights suit against the state that led to the legalization of equal marriage in May 2004. Also in attendance were attorney Mary Bonauto, who successfully argued the case before the Massachusetts Supreme Court, and the Goodridge’s 9-year-old daughter, Annie. Sinkford officiated at the marriage of the Goodridges at UUA headquarters on the day that marriage became legal for them.

Other anniversary events included a party at the Parkman House next door to UUA headquarters, hosted by Boston mayor Thomas Menino, and a photograph of hundreds of marriage-equality supporters in front of the Massachusetts State House.

Although the day was about celebrating, Hillary Goodridge said she still had concerns that a 2006 state ballot initiative could jeopardize the legality of her marriage. If the state legislature passes a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage next year, the issue could make it to the ballot for the citizens of the state to decide. “That looms in the back of our heads,” she said. “But as more and more people see Armageddon didn’t happen, it’s hard to make an argument against it.”

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