Media roundup: Seattle UU receives courage award

Media roundup: Seattle UU receives courage award

A weekly guide to stories about Unitarian Universalists from other media sources.

Rachel Walden

Advertisement

Unitarian Universalist Marcus Green is the recipient of the 2015 Courage Award for Culture from Seattle, Washington, news journal, Crosscut.com. Green received the award in part for his vocal support of opening a dialogue on racism and for creating the South Seattle Emerald, a community news website with a knack for thoughtful commentary of issues of race, equity, and justice. Green is a member of Westside Unitarian Universalist Church in Seattle. ( Crosscut.com – 10.26.15)

Banner vandalism inspires interfaith support

When leaders of Trinity Baptist Church in Arlington, Massachusetts, learned that the “Black Lives Matter” banner put up by First Parish Unitarian Universalist in Arlington was vandalized and permanently damaged, they responded with their own signs of support. Trinity’s minister said that the church just couldn’t stand by and allow such messages of racism to go unopposed. ( The Arlington Advocate– 10.28.15)

More coverage:

“Black Lives Matter Sign Vandalized at Mass. Church” ( NECN.com – 10.26.15)

Human rights activists connect with UU church

As the city of Houston, Texas, considers an equal rights ordinance, Human Rights Campaign (HRC) activists joined people of faith in the area for a Souls to the Polls campaign to encourage religious people to vote. HRC organizer Ryan Wilson joined folks at Emerson Unitarian Universalist Church for their event and found the experience—as a gay man who was raised in a less supportive church—healing and rewarding. ( Human Rights Campaign – 10.29.15)

More coverage:

"Stand for justice" ( Houston Chronicle - 10.29.15)

UU leads hospice singing group

After attending a workshop on bedside singing for people in their last days and hours of life, Harry Vayo, music director at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Waterville, Maine, was inspired to start his own group. Called the Tourmaline Singers, Vayo says the work feeds his soul and creates profound moments where the boundaries of giving and receiving break down. ( Portland Press Herald – 10.24.15)

Advertisement